welcome

to the Tompkins County Climate Protection Initiative

309 North Aurora Street | Ithaca, NY 14850 | info@tccpi.org

Meeting Highlights: 2017

April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017


April 2017

The Datalogger Project: Enabling Sustainable Communities – Howard Chong

Howard Chong, assistant professor of economics and sustainability at Cornell’s School of Hotel Administration and Faculty Fellow at the Atkinson Center for Sustainable Future, provided an update on his Datalogger Project, which seeks to improve residential energy efficiency in the community.

  • Is there an easy, cheap way to tell which houses need energy efficiency retrofits?
  • Datalogger allows one to identify houses for about $5 – can find leaky homes qand then fix them
  • Since 1980s national labs have identified energy upgrades as cost effective
    • In leaky buildings 9about 25-50%)
    • Savings pay for themselves if done correctly
    • Overall savings of about 10% of US heating and cooling: $10 billion
  • Less than 1% of homes have been retrofitted
  • “Old way” to identify homes: $500 & two hours of labor
  • “New way” with datalogger: $5 or less (continuous, automatic with zero labor)
  • How quickly does house lose heat?
  • Project includes 383 homes – lots of heterogeneity
  • Temperature easier to relate to than energy efficiency
  • Just completed 30 houses in same neighborhood – all houses built around same time
  • Developing complete process to measure and analyze temperature data
  • Houses that are leakier lose their heat more quickly at night
  • Dataloggers collect data for two weeks – not 100% effective but a lot easier to scale up than the usual energy audits
  • Possible to characterize all 20,000 homes around Ithaca in two hours
  • Partnering with the Longmont, CO Public Library to carry out community thermostat experiment
  • “Vulnerable homes”: not just retrofits – touches on social justice dimension
  • Identifies unsafe homes and those that would be hurt by pricing reforms
  • Fossil fuel goal will be much cheaper with retrofits
  • Almost no path to “fossil free” without retrofits
  • With retrofits, homes will be safer, more comfortable, and cheaper
  • Data logger and temperature methods tell you which houses should be a priority
  • Targets houses rather than apartment buildings – duplexes possible, though
  • Doesn’t address issue of getting people to carry out retrofits after houses identified
  • One possible next step: working withreal estate agents and residential energy score project
  • Will also work with renters – what about using with commercial sector?
  • Not great with commercial buildings because they are “core dominated”

 

Beyond the Climate March – Reed Steberger & Jane Whiting

Reed Steberger is the assistant coordinator of TCCPI and program director at the Multicultural Resource Center. Reed and Jane Whiting, the TCCPI youth sector representative, recently facilitated an ECO-TCCPI Talking Circle at MRC on race in the environmental movement. They reported on the Talking Circle and their plans going forward for continuing to promote conversations about climate action that recognize the importance of racial justice in the movement.

  • ECO/TCCPI Talking Circle held earlier this month on April 14-15
  • Attendees all under age of 23 – very dynamic exchange of ideas and views
  • Focused on presence of racism in climate change efforts
  • Different levels of racism:
    • Individual/Personal
    • Internalized/White Supremacy
    • Systemic/Institutions
  • Group fairly diverse: total of 12 participants with four individuals of color
  • Talking Circle puts face at center of conversation about climate work
  • Invisible nature of white privilege needs to be confronted
  • Hope to hold another similar event in the fall

 

Global EconomicTrends in Renewable Energy – Peter Bardaglio

The 2016 numbers on solar and wind development have just been released in several different reports. Some good news here that will hopefully inspire us to do even more!

  • Our Biggest Challenge? Time is not on our side.
  • The good news:
    • Renewable energy and energy efficiency can be quickly scaled-up
    • Accelerating the deployment of renewables will:
    • Fuel economic growth
    • Create new employment opportunities
    • Improve human welfare
    • Contribute to climate-safe future
  • Not so good news:
    • But growth rate for renewables must double to keep global warming under 2°C
    • Need to reduce GHG emissions by 2.6% per year on average to meet the Paris target
    • Around 70% of the global energy supply mix in 2050 would need to be low-carbon
    • Obviously a heavy lift
  • Energy transition affordable but will require additional investments in low-carbon technologies
  • Further significant cost reductions of renewables will be major driver for increased investment
  • Additional investment of $29 trillion needed between now and 2050
  • But reducing impact on human health and mitigating climate change would save 2-6 times more than costs of decarbonization
  • Global renewable power generation capacity last year increased by 161 GW or 9.3%, making 2016 fifth year in a row it has grown 8% or more
  • Dramatic rollback of U.S. energy and climate policies under Trump administration
  • S. has handed leadership over to Asia and Europe – clearly key to reducing GHG emissions
  • Explosive growth in solar
  • Asian economies had largest expansion in solar last year with gain of 50 GW
  • 34 GW came from China alone – more than doubled its solar capacity in 2016
  • Compared to 11 GW in U.S., 8 GW in Japan, and 5 GW in Europe
  • Almost three-quarters of new wind energy capacity was installed last year in just four countries: China (+19 GW); USA (+9 GW); Germany (+5 GW); and India (+4 GW)
  • Brazil continued to show strong growth, with an increase of 2 GW in 2016
  • In the US, renewables made up 99.2% of new electricity generation capacity in Q1 2016
  • Renewables grew from 14% of U.S. electricity in Q1 2015 to 17% in Q1 2016
  • Solar + wind combined grew from 5% to 7%
  • Solar finally reached 1% of U.S. electricity generation, considered to be an important tipping point
  • Coal dropped from 36% to 29%
  • Since 2007 overall world renewable energy capacity has increased dramatically – jumped from 990,000 MW to 2 million MW in 2016
  • Global investment in renewables has shown steady growth for more than a decade, rising from $47 billion in 2004 to a record $305 billion in 2015
  • Dramatic drop in cost of renewable energy production has made it competitive with coal and natural gas – in some cases even cheaper
  • Price of utility-scale solar dropped 62% from 2009 to 2015 and projected to drop another 57% by 2025
  • Renewables have become significant source of new employment around world
  • Renewable energy jobs rose by 5% in 2015 to 8.1 million – an additional 1.3 million in large-scale hydropower
  • Solar PV was the largest single renewable energy employer – 2.8 million jobs, up 11% from 2014
  • S. wind and solar industries employ more than 300,000 workers
  • Wind energy sector employs nearly 90,000 Americans, 20% more than in 2015
  • America's solar industry employs nearly 209,000 workers, compared to about 150,000 jobs remaining in coal
  • Key benefits of doubling renewables:
    • Would limit average global temperature rise to 2 °C above pre-industrial levels (when coupled with energy efficiency)
    • Would avoid up to 12 gigatonnes of energy-related CO2 emissions in 2030 – five times higher than what countries have pledged to reduce through renewable energy in their nationally determined contributions (NDCs)
    • Would result in 24.4 million jobs in the renewable energy sector by 2030, compared to 9.2 million in 2014
    • Would reduce air pollution enough to save up to 4 million lives per year in 2030
    • Would boost the global GDP by up to USD 1.3 trillion
  • Urgent that we keep pressure up on our elected officials to support the growth of renewable energy and accelerate transition to a clean energy economy

March 2017

Energy Smart Community Survey & Focus Group Results – Rosalyn Bandy, Rich Stedman, and Dylan Bugden

Rosalyn Bandy, the Energy Smart Community Leader at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tompkins County, and Rich Steadman, Professor in the Department of Natural Resources at Cornell, shared their findings from two different studies: an NSF survey of 2000 households in the community seeking to explore the various factors that might affect the response to the rollout of the smart meter program; and a series of focus group meetings aimed at facilitating better communications around the rollout. Dylan Bugden is a graduate assistant in the Human Dimensions Research Unit in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell.

    A. ESC Survey
  • Carried out research on the introduction of smart meters in Tompkins County – research objectives:
  • Evaluate familiarity and trust
  • Understand attitudes and behaviors
  • Evaluate factors that affect attitudes and behaviors
  • Survey of 2000 Tompkins County residents living in “Grid Upgrade Area” – north of Buffalo St. – a random sample
  • GUA demographics
    • Highly educated
    • Mean household of 2.48
    • 7% male
    • Liberal
    • 50% earn more than $100K
    • Predominantly white
    • Nearly all have engaged in some energy saving behavior
  • Research shows low familiarity but generally positive attitude towards utility and use of smart meters
  • Strong minority, however, not positive
  • Trust in utility key factor in roll out of new energy technology
  • Highest levels of tryst that utility will follow government reulations and proect their personal information
  • Lowest level: consider customer needs before changing their service
  • Attitudes complex: cognitive, affective, and behavioral
  • Respondents unlikely not to participate – 10.6% would choose not to participate and 65% would
  • Attitudes toward smart meters tend to be positive (78.8%)
  • Energy analysis tools most likely to be used – smart home technologies least likely to be used
  • “constructs homeowners used to make sense of new technology: familiarity, trust in utility, climate change awareness, price, attitudes towards renewable energy
  • Familiarity and climate change perceptions are strongest factors
  • Factors affecting engagement with enable products: greater familiarity, more positive attitudes, higher income
  • Homeowners with more positive attitudes more likely to use enabled products
  • People’s incomes seems to have little impact except in area of engagement
  • Overall findings:
    • Attitudes generally positive but fragile
    • Most undecided about how they will use enabled products
    • Income probably barrier to using some products
    • Engagement matters:
      • Familiarity is low
      • General sense of transparency
      • Modest/low levels of trust with utility
      • Somewhat unequal balance of risk and benefit
      • Communications might focus on relationship between engagement and climate change attitudes
    B. Focus Groups
  • Focus groups gring data alive through community voices – dig beneath quantitative data
  • Eight to ten people in each group: northside of Ithaca, Southside, CCE staff, Lansing
  • Goal: understand population’s knowledge and perceptions about smart meters
  • Focus groups diverse across groups but less so internally – intentional
  • Questions asked:
    • What would you like to know?
    • How might smart meters benefit you?
    • What concerns do you have?
    • How might you use information
  • Will smart meters eliminate estimated (inaccurate) bills?
  • Who does it benefit? How hard will it be to use? How much time will it take? Will my bill go up?
  • Could help increase renewables, move away from fossil fuels
  • Provides info on household energy use
  • Could make billing more accurate
  • Can help change energy use behavior
  • Helps with connection to smart appliances
  • Concerns involve new technology that might not work – privacy and security concerns
  • Health concerns about radio transmissions
  • Too complicated for average person
  • Impact on employment of meter readers
  • Equity issues
  • Residents clearly have minimal prior knowledge
  • Health and privacy concerns significant
  • Residents concerned about being financially punished
  • Recognize how new technology can contribute to energy conservation
  • We need to be aware of how some people may be disproportionately, negative affected
  • Will be holding public meetings prior to and during rollout: Lansing, Dryden, Groton, Cayuga Heights
  • CCETC website will provide more info
  • Will provide individual smart meter emissions readings *radio frequency levels) upon request
  • Would make sense to do separate studies of renters

 

NYSEG HeatSmart II – Jonathan Comstock

Jonathan Comstock, the Program Director of HeatSmart II, updated the group on the latest campaign to encourage Tompkins County residents to improve the insulation of their homes and purchase heat pumps.

  • Part of Solar Tompkins – nonprofit
  • Solar Tompkins most successful solarize program in NYS
  • Solar Tompkins & its HeatSmart program are home grown local efforts
  • Volunteer conceived and developed
  • Board members from every town and city
  • Motivated by concerns for climate change and pollution associated with our energy use
  • We focus on solutions, not complaints
  • HeatSmart removes barriers to unleash the strength of individual action:
  • Lower cost
  • Lack of information
  • Confidence in a path forward
  • HeatSmart is a win-win event for residents and the environment alike:
    • Improves comfort and health
    • Lowers operating costs
    • Lowers carbon footprint
  • Residential sector responsible for 21% of carbon emissions In Tompkins County
  • 75% of home energy use is used for home heating, cooling, and hot water
  • More than 70% of that is from fossil fuels
  • Residents need help to understand their options and act
  • Installers need motivation and opportunity to promote the best climate-friendly options
  • Comments from HeatSmart participants:
    • Heat pumps offered comfort, economy, and satisfaction – shared family experience
    • HeatSmart allowed us to take steps that were otherwise daunting
    • New technologies simply explained, known good pricing, ease of choosing an installer with confidence
    • HeatSmart tours helped us learn more about the technology and the experience of having the work done (see www.solartompkins.org)
    • Heat pump cooling in summer was a much bigger plus than we expected
  • Air sealing and insulation important
  • Act of heating a building’s interior actually creates drafts if air-sealing is inadequate
  • So-called ‘stack effect’ is driven by hot air escaping from attics and suction pulling cold air into basements
  • If all leaks in a typical home were combined, they would be equivalent to having a window open every day of the year
  • A quarter of upstate NY homes are 75 years or older
  • 42% of homes have no foundation insulation
  • Almost 7% have no wall insulation
  • Benefits of insulated and air-sealed homes:
    • Save energy and money on your utility bills
    • Improve the interior environment of your home and eliminate common problems
    • Better humidity control
    • Lower chance of ice dams
      on roofs
    • Reduced noise from outside
    • Less pollen, insect, and pest
      intrusion
  • What is a heat pump?
    • Runs on electricity using refrigeration technology
    • Heats in the winter and can switch to cooling in the summer
    • Can pump against the temperature gradient from cold to hot or hot to cold
    • Super energy efficient! (250-350%)
  • Two basic types: Air-Source (ASHP) and Ground-Source (GSHP) heat pumps
  • Replacement of your existing water heater with an ASHP hot water unit can be big bang for your buck, and big carbon footprint reduction (22% of fossil fuel heating in many homes)
  • Best when situated in a semi-conditioned basement – these units will slightly cool the room 1-5 o
  • Three times better efficiency compared to traditional electric heaters – low operating costs
  • For many homes this represents a low cost opportunity to take big step on zero carbon path, and it can pay for itself
  • ASHPs offered through HeatSmart operate down to -13oF and below – evolution of technology dramatic in recent years
  • ASHP Pros:
    • Minimal Infrastructure:
    • Ductless versions have no extra ‘heat distribution’ costs
    • Multiple inside units are all individually controlled
    • Very small ‘footprint’ for equipment and no digging
    • Always provide heating and air-conditioning as well
  • ASHP Cons:
    • Heat distribution can be limited by number of inside units
    • Outdoor compressors exposed to the elements
    • Max BTU output declines at very low temperatures
    • Seasonal energy Efficiency only 250%, lower than for GSHP
  • GSHP Pros:
    • Highest seasonally-averaged energy efficiency (350 to 400%)
    • Takes advantage of existing heat distribution systems
    • NYSERDA incentive of $1,500 / ton (still needs final approval)
    • Heating capacity not affected by outside air temperature
    • Ground-loop system lasts 50 years or more, pumps/compressors indoors
  • GSHP Cons:
    • Substantial adder costs can arise:
    • Vertical loop field drilling, property remediation
    • Heat distribution upgrades (e.g. adapting hydronic systems)
    • Land area requirements greater, more ground disturbance
  • Enrollment is done online at SolarTompkins.org
  • (paper enrollment forms available on request)
  • HeatSmart asks that you initially pick one Installer Partner
    • Pricing is already negotiated and public
    • Majority of enrollees pick and contract with their first choice installer
  • If after first assessment, you feel the need for a second evaluation, then contact HeatSmart Program Director
  • Heat pumps have lowest operating costs – can save significant $$ with heat pumps
  • ASHP has annual cost of $760 and GSHP has annual cost of $650
  • ASHP for average home costs $12,550 to install and GSHP costs $16,800 after NYSERDA incentive
  • Snug Planet, Halco, and EP Environmental are three approved installers for HeatSmart

February 2017

Energy Smart Community Baseline Survey – Charleen Heidt

Charleen Heidt is the Community Outreach Coordinator for the Energy Smart Community. She presented an overview of the results from the recent Energy Smart Community Baseline Survey.

  • As part of the Energy Smart Community, NYSEG baseline survey conducted to determine:
    • Consumer acceptance of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI)  and innovative rate structures
    • Usage propensities for a variety of new distributed energy resources (DER) products and services
    • Optimal ways to communicate with customers
  • Online survey administered by Cornell’s Survey Research Institute
  • To what extent is survey sample skewed because online? Only “completes” used in the final analysis
  • Segmented Tompkins County residents in terms of their attitudes towards energy, energy use, climate change, etc.
  • Segment #1: 43% of Tompkins County (vs. 16% nationwide) “convinced and committed” regarding climate change – well educated, primarily professionals (35%) and white collar (21%) and more retirees (27%) than national data; they engage in the highest number of conservation activities
  • Segment #2: Parents concerned about climate change – 29% of Tompkins County vs. 38% nationwide
  • Segment #3: Working class and/or student pragmatists – 17% of Tompkins County vs. 29% nationwide
  • Segment #4: Unconvinced traditionalists – motivated by cost savings – above average number of conservation activities
  • When asked, “How important would you say energy conservation is in way it affects your daily purchase choices and activities?” – Energy conservation is a stronger driver of purchase decisions and daily activities for TC residents
  • Environmental concerns are strong energy conservation drivers for Tompkins County residents
  • Economic drivers almost as important as environmental concerns
  • Unusual to have two drivers almost equal – nationally, economic drivers much stronger
  • 63% strongly agree and 19% agree that climate change is real and primarily due to manmade causes – compared to 27% (strongly agree) and 37% (agree) nationally
  • Residents think climate change primarily caused by truck and car GHG emissions
  • Only 8% think home energy use is the number one man-made cause of global warming or climate change
  • TC residents have already engaged in energy efficiency activities or plan to do so in the future: 77% changed behavior at home to save energy and 56% replaced incandescent bulbs with LEDs (not CFLs)
  • Advance meter infrastructure findings: less than one-third know what smart meters are/do,with Tompkins County residents more aware than others in NYSEG service territory (31% vs 19%)
  • Only 8% have heard of smart meters and are very familiar with what they do
  • Small portion (less than 10%) dislike the idea of a smart meter, being primarily concerned about privacy and data security
  • 26% of that group (8%) are worried about how it might affect personal or family’s health
  • Innovative rate plan interest: about half of Tompkins County NYSEG customers interested in time of use (TOU) plan
  • Enabling technology leads to interest in TOU rate option and optimization
  • Of those neutral or unlikely to participate in TOU -- cost savings as small as 10% or less increases incentive enough to increase likely participation
  • 23% are likely to purchase solar PV vs. 9% who already have
  • Emails and monthly bill inserts are the best ways to communicate, followed by other electronic options
  • Key findings:
    • Energy attitudes
      • Enivornmental concerns are key value and behavioral drivers for TC residents
      • NSYEG has the opportunity to increase perceived value by providing products and services that are aligned with these attitudes
    • AMI awareness
      • As AMI awareness is relatively low, there is an opportunity for education that informs the customers and helps create advocates for prodcuts and services that are aligned with their stated values
      • For the less than 10% of customers who are skeptical of AMI, privacy, security and trust are the top reasons. NSYEG’s present brand equity is critical to mitigate these concerns.
    • Interest in TOU
      • There is a strong interest in TOU rates
      • Enabling technology and potential cost savings will further increase opt-in rates.
    • Communication preferences
      • NYSEG presently has customer-preferred communication channels to support the increased awareness, engagement and adoption as the Company becomes the Distributed System Platform Provider
    • Distributed energy usage
      • As would be expected, given the attitudes and values of Tompkins County customers, there is a higher level of DER engagement and propensity for adoption.

 

NYSEG and Alternatives to the West Dryden Pipeline – Irene Weiser

Irene Weiser, a member of the Caroline Town Board and the TCAD Task Force on Energy and Economic Development, updated the group on the results of the Task Force’s discussion with NYSEG regarding alternatives to the West Dryden pipeline and she facilitated a discussion about next steps.

  • Movement from proposed natural gas pipeline in Dryden to renewable energy alternatives
  • Residents along West Dryden Rd. notified in May 2014 of NYSEG plans for 10-inch steel natural gas pipeline
  • Led to grassroots activism:
    • Door-to-door canvassing – don’t sign easement agreement
    • Set up meeting with eminent domain attorney to educate all
    • Lawn signs, website, etc.
  • Advocated for heat pumps as viable alternative
  • Presented to town boards, economic development groups, etc.
  • Fractivists attended county committee meetings such as planning and economic development
  • Wrote letters and op eds for local newspapers
  • Pushed for no new natural gas: more than 75 people at County Legislature meeting after COP21
  • Encouraged formation of Energy and Economic Development Task Force (EEDTF)
  • Key turning point: learned that new pipeline was for “peak demand”
  • $17.8 million for about 14-30 days per year
  • Encouraged public comments on EEDTF report
  • Discussed alternatives to pipeline with PSC chair
  • Spoke at NYSEG rate case public hearing in Binghamton (Fall 2015)
  • Joined rate case as party, cross examined NYSEG and PSC staff about alternatives
  • Parallel actions promoting heat pumps as alternative for Maplewood and other development projects
  • EEDTF report issued in June 2016 – calls for alternatives, requests meetings with NYSEG and PSC
  • EEDTF got Chair Zibelman to come to Ithaca for a high-level meeting in July, followed by a meeting in Albany on Nov. 9 and a meeting of several engineers from both "sides"
  • Continued conversations in December and January, among EEDTF, the PSC, and NYSEG resulted in Zibelman telling NYSEG what they needed to do
  • NYSEG engineers agreed that small compressor station is possible alternative
  • Organized large grassroots communications effort to push NYSEG and PSC
  • NYSEG then issued letter proposing alternatives
    • Seeks approval for compressor station to meet reliability concerns – would continue moratorium on natural gas expansion in Lansing
    • RFP to increase energy efficiency, decrease demand, and pursue alternative hearing sources
    • Ask towns to change building codes
  • New developments:
    • PSC commissioners leaving in mid-March
    • Power plant devaluation
    • Lansing concerns over economic development
    • Lansing lawsuit vs. NYSEG/PSC demanding natural gas?
    • Decision on alternative – when?
    • Need to be ready so developers choose heat pumps, not propane
  • Next steps:
    • Energy confab sponsored by park Foundation helped spark strategic thinking
    • Media: report on heat pumps already in use
    • Lansing outreach

January 2017

Cornell Climate Neutral Campus Options – Bob Howarth

Bob Howarth, the David R. Atkinson Professor of Ecology and Environmental Biology at Cornell, presented the University’s recent report on the options for achieving its goal of climate neutrality by 2035.

  • Presented on behalf of Senior Leaders Climate Action Group (SLAG)
  • Campus committed to goal of reaching carbon neutrality by 2035
  • In March 2016 Provost charged SLAG with developing study of options – not easy to do – will take lot of creativity and $$
  • Three sections in report:
    • Solutions for evaluating projects
    • Solutions for today
    • Solutions for tomorrow
  • New information & updated financial analysis
  • Also new tools for valuing projects – not just economic
  • Important to account for methane leakage
  • Cornell central heating system switch from coal to natural gas in 2011
  • Substantially less CO2 but methane became key issue
  • Assessing climate impacts of methane emissions follows approach developed by Bob Howard in 2015
  • Cornell’s natural gas comes from PA – shale gas – very high methane emissions
  • Social cost of carbon – also economic toll of climate change impacts
  • Quadruple bottom line project analysis: 1) purpose; 2) people; 3) prosperity; and 4) planet
  • Solutions for today recommendations:
    • Campus engagement – ensure all students graduate with climate literacy competency
    • Build high-performance buildings – modify capital projects approval to incorporate quadruple bottom line – expand energy conservation initiative
    • Increase EV capacity
  • Solutions for tomorrow recommendations:
    • Heating and powering solutions – what’s feasible? At what scale?
    • Serious challenges: high energy demand and extreme weather solutions; current low cost of fossil fuels; reducing energy demand of campus buildings
    • Opportunities: advancement of Cornell’s academic & land grant mission:; reduced financial exposure to increasingly unstable fossil fuel resources
  • Examined wide range of approaches: earth source heat: WWS; biomass; air and ground source heat pumps; nuclear; business as usual + carbon credits
  • Earth source heat and WWS have lowest operating costs (excludes capital costs)
  • Not sure earth source heat will work – won’t proceed without community support
  • Capital costs for all of the solutions very high -- external sources of funding for these efforts offer the only apparent way to pay for them without major disruptions to teaching mission
  • Cornell should seek partnerships with local, state and federal government, private corporations, and non-profit foundations
  • Building of consortium of engaged partners should begin immediately – could be great benefit of the Cornell commitment to carbon neutrality
  • Could enhance local economy and magnify impact through this demonstration of small community achieving carbon neutrality
  • Economic risks associated with “business as usual” including a vulnerability to volatility in fossil-fuel based energy prices and potential federal carbon charges or cap-and-trade regulations
  • Where Cornell cannot reduce all net emissions to zero, pursue mission-linked carbon offsets that strengthen local resilience
  • Offsets should be framed as more than additional burdens – offer unique and important opportunities for multidisciplinary research and community partnership
  • Energy storage significant missing piece of report – also not a lot of attention paid to life cycle analysis

 

Roundtable Updates on 2016 Accomplishments – All

The group shared two or three of their organization’s top achievements regarding climate protection and clean energy in 2016 as well as a brief preview of plans for 2017.

  • Sarah Hess: Planning for Energy Expo/Fair
  • Chuck Geisler: West Dryden pipeline opposition and participation in energy smart community project
  • Bob Howarth: Working with County on methane emissions and effort to bring it to state level
  • Sarah Brylinsky: Quadruple analysis in report had very positive impact on other higher ed institutions through AASHE network
  • Irene Weiser: Participation on Energy and Economic Development Task Force source of inspiration – work on stopping power plant conversion to natural gas fed into this – promoting community choice aggregation – petition drive and yard signs in support of Black Oak Wind Farm
  • Andy Germain: Working with Bert Bland on improving energy efficiency of buildings at Cornell
  • Jim Armstrong: Climate Changers project – also Good for Business once again approved as B-Corp
  • Humera Oasim: Working on climate action in Pakistan
  • Bert Bland: Four new solar farms for total of 10MW – now 7% of Cornell’s annual electricity consumption
  • Reed: work on convergence of racial and climate justice movements
  • Roxanne Marino: Involvement at grass roots level with energy issues, esp. HeatSmart – interested in helping to develop more unified approach
  • Kimberly Anderson: Very happy to join Cornell Sustainability Offfice
  • Shad Ryan: Working with Krys Cail on cooperative solar model
  • Charleen Heidt: Wonderful opportunity to bring her marketing expertise to Energy Smart Community
  • Briana Amoroso: Finishing up her MA on sustainability engineering – working at Taitem on NYSEG demonstration project and helping with Ithaca 2030 District energy and water baseline project
  • Carol Anne Barsody: Grateful to join Ithaca community this past year and become new at-large member of TCCPI steering committee
  • Rena Scroggins: 76West clean energy competition – helping to support REV goals
  • Guillermo Metz: Excited about work on County Energy Road Map – would love to see umbrella group coming out of this work – will be launching another solarize campaign in March, Go Solar
  • Katie Borgella: County Energy Road Map and update of GHG Emissions Inventory – looking forward to developing more detailed County energy strategy and electric car infrastructure
  • Andrew Gil: New green birthing facility at Cayuga Medical Center and LEED certification for Park Foundation office – participation on TCCPI steering committee and Ithaca 2030 District advisory board
  • Peter Bardaglio: Establishment of Ithaca 2030 District; continuing to make progress on Black Oak Wind Farm; board participation at New Roots and Groundswell Center for Local Food and Farming
  • Ed Marx: County leadership on transition to clean energy; expansion of EV fleet
  • Nick Goldsmith: Completion of Residential Energy Score Project and possibility of statewide dissemination; this coming year: Green Building Policy project
  • Krys Cail: GreenStar treasurer and DE2 model for shared solar
  • Liz Thomas: Implementing solar law in Ulysses and town planner’s work on Residential Energy Score project – purchase of town hybrid vehicle – education of local government officials on clean energy issues – new heat pubmp for Ulysses town hall
  • Jan Rhodes Norman: Completion of GreenStar solar farm; having Local First Ithaca become district management entity for Ithaca 2030 District; participation on Finger Lakes Reuse board, especially opening of new facility
  • Megan McDonald: Working with Bob Howarth on methane emissions analysis for County; coming year: getting County certified as Clean Energy Community
  • Brian Eden: Helping to develop better analysis of heat pumps to demonstrate improved GHG gas emissions with new, financially viable technology
  • Gay Nicholson: Finger lakes Climate Fun raised record amount of $$ last year – awarded first heat pump grant; providing regional groups vehicle for collaboration on sustainability through Sustainable Tompkins

 

TCCPI Priorities for 2017 – Peter Bardaglio

At its meeting earlier this month, the TCCPI Steering Committee identified the following priorities for 2017:

    1. Growing the 2030 District
    2. Supporting the County’s Development of an Energy Strategy
    3. Continuing the Youth Climate Justice Program
    4. Tracking Federal Policy on Climate and Energy
    5. Disseminating the TCCPI Model in the Region
  • The group provided feedback on these goals
  • On #2:
    • How do we pay for it?
    • Energy Smart Community
    • HeatSmart Tompkins
    • Green Building Policy
  • On #3: Need to include state policy
  • On #4: Focus on university and college towns – for example, Onondaga, Monroe, and Erie